Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist – 2555 8th Ave W

Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist, 1941
Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist, 1941

http://denistar.rs/?enot=https-ctoption-test https ctoption test On June 17, 2009, the (former) Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist located at 2555 8th Avenue West, designed by Harlan Thomas (Thomas & Grainger) in 1926, was designated a City of Seattle Landmark by unanimous vote of the Landmarks Board at their semi-monthly meeting. The landmark report was prepared and presented by Larry Johnson, AIA, principal of The Johnson Partnership, with the assistance of Queen Anne Historical Society Landmarks Preservation Committee members, Char Eggleston and Leanne Olson. Also in attendance were two granddaughters of architect Harlan Thomas (Koque Thomas Todd and Edith Williams Shuman) as well as Jay Kelly, Minister of the Seattle Church of Christ (current owners of the property). All ten board members present voted unanimously to approve the designation based on the building meeting three of the six designation criteria specified by the City of Seattle Landmarks ordinance. …Continue reading “Seventh Church of Christ, Scientist – 2555 8th Ave W”

Isn’t It Time to Landmark the Coliseum?

Supporters at the Seattle Center Coliseum
Supporters celebrating a “HeartBomb” at Seattle Center’s Coliseum last Valentine’s Day
(courtesy of the author)

Köpa Inderal Oskarshamn The more things change, the more they stay the same. Four years ago Michael Herschensohn was published on Crosscut.com asking the same question I am asking today.

tastylia strips reviews A landmark designation for the Coliseum, or KeyArena as newcomers might call it, is a certainty. But as a relative Seattle newcomer myself, I beg the question, why wasn’t it landmarked before? My guess is the recession, plus a dash of politics, had something to do with it.

nonprescription viagra Let’s hypothesize for a minute, that the Coliseum is landmarked this year – now what? Seattle Center is motivated to keep the Coliseum as an entertainment venue and ideally attract a professional basketball team and unrealistically attract a professional hockey team. Seattle Center is inclined to keep their revenue stream alive and well for themselves. I understand Seattle Center’s intentions, but I view them as solely self-serving.

binäre optionen finger weg Are Seattle Center’s self-serving intentions justified? As a subset of the City of Seattle shouldn’t they do what is best for the city as a whole? For those that are hell-bent on attracting professional sports teams and building an arena, one that is supposedly paid for with private funds, SODO is an obvious option. Although at a recent QAHS board meeting my fellow QAHS board member Leanne Olson also reminded Seattle Center that no action is also an option. Leanne’s “no action is an option” also holds true for the City of Seattle.

grafici a candela gratis per opzioni binarie Continuing to hypothesize, if an arena is built in SODO, then what should the Coliseum become? Seattle Center has responded by stating that they would investigate other entertainment attractions to stave off loss of revenue.

iq optionn For a second, I propose we ignore the driver of revenue and ask what does the city need? Does it need more classroom space? Does it need more affordable housing? Does it need temporary housing for the homeless?… Does it need another entertainment venue?

Köpa Kamagra jelly It turns out the greater Seattle community is currently discussing all of these questions, except that last question. Only private investors, who have everything to gain and nothing to lose, are asking for a new arena.

binary options trading signals franco forum After asking myself these questions, I have come up with a proposal: landmark the Coliseum, consider an arena in SODO if you must, and discuss with the Queen Anne community (not just Uptown) what the future of the Coliseum should be.

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More Infomation: 3rd Annual HeartBomb–at the Coliseum

SPU Shooter Found Guilty

Trolley Barn at Ross, undated
Trolley Barn at Ross, undated, now Otto Miller Hall site of the shootings
Otto Miller Hall, SPU, 2016
Otto Miller Hall, SPU, 2016. Remodeled Trolley Barn, site of the shootings.

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On November 16, 2016, a jury found Aaron Ybarra guilty of first-degree murder in the June 2014 shootings at Seattle Pacific University that killed one student and injured two others. Ybarra had pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. The jury, acknowledging Ybarra’s history of mental illness, rejected the plea concluding that Ybarra was fully aware of what he was doing and that the crime was premeditated.

Student Paul Lee was killed by Ybarra on the sidewalk outside SPU’s Otto Miller Hall (formerly a municipal railway trolley barn). Thomas Fowler was hit by pellets from the shot that killed Lee. Ybarra attempted to shoot a second person outside Otto Miller Hall, but his gun misfired. Entering the building, Ybarra critically wounded student Sarah Williams and attempted to shoot a second student. Student monitor Jon Meis then tackled Ybarra ending the shootings. Ybarra faces 88 to 111 years in prison. His attorney plans to appeal. (Seattle Times, November 17, 2016, p. B1). For more information see this Seattle Times article  and this earlier posting on qahistory.org.

KEXP Landmarks Board Report

Interior of KEXP's new space
Interior of KEXP’s new space

Your Landmarks Committee tries to attend every meeting of the city’s Landmarks Preservation Board (LPB) and its Architectural Review Committee (ARC) when Queen Anne buildings and sites are on the agenda. We offer public input at those meetings in the hope of guiding the preservation of our neighborhood’s historic character and its designated landmarks.

…Continue reading “KEXP Landmarks Board Report”