Shooting at SPU, Ross and the Streetcar Barn

Mourners, June 6, 2014
Mourners, June 6, 2014

The scourge of campus shootings came to Queen Anne on June 5, 2014 when 26-year-old Aaron Ybarra opened fire in Otto Miller Hall. Ybarra wounded three students one of whom, 19-year-old Paul Lee, died. Ybarra was subdued with pepper spray as he tried to reload his gun by 22-year-old SPU student Jon Meis, who restrained him until the arrival of Seattle Police. Meis was treated at the hospital and later released, along with another victim, Thomas Fowler, 24, who suffered pellet wounds to his chest and neck. The third victim, Sarah Williams, 19, was hospitalized after suffering wounds to her abdomen.

The tragic event at Seattle Pacific University astounded Queen Anne residents, the Christian university maintains a generally quiet and peaceful place in the community’s mind. The school’s low profile hides the fact that it is one of Seattle’s oldest institutions of higher learning. SPU is typical of so many seminaries associated with a church and established for the elementary education of congregation children. In fact, Nils Peterson, a member of the Free Methodist Church with which the university is still associated, donated the land for the school as a place for his children. Today Peterson’s farm which originally tumbled down the northern side of Queen Anne is mostly intact and now known as Mount Pleasant Cemetery. …Continue reading “Shooting at SPU, Ross and the Streetcar Barn”

Albert S Kerry House – 421 W Highland Dr

Kerry House, 1913
Kerry House, 1913

This home was designed for the lumberman and Seattle civic leader Albert S. Kerry, Sr. (1866-1939) by the Bebb and Mendel architectural firm. The house, in altered form, stands on the southeast corner of Highland Drive and 5th Avenue West. …Continue reading “Albert S Kerry House – 421 W Highland Dr”

Early History of Queen Anne

Mercer House, 1900
Mercer House, 1900

After an exploration in December, 1852 of Smith’s Cove and on to Salmon Bay, David T. Denny decided on living in what is now lower Queen Anne, generally the area between today’s Denny Way and Mercer St. from Elliott Bay to Lake Union.

Married in January, 1853 in his brother Arthur’s cabin, David and new wife Louisa Boren filed a 320-acre donation claim the next day, where he built a one-room log cabin on the bluff overlooking Elliott Bay, near Denny Way and Western. Built of nearby trees without a single nail, Louisa planted Sweetbrier roses outside the front door. The roses were found still there growing wild in 1931, when they were uprooted for a new commercial building on the site.1 …Continue reading “Early History of Queen Anne”

  1. Queen Anne: Community on the Hill; Queen Anne Historical Society; 1993